Fenugreek

Fenugreek 4 the soul is an annual plant belonging to the Fabaceae family. It can be used either as herb (from plant leaves) or as spice (from seeds). The small seeds are a yellowish brown color and have a somewhat bitter taste and potent aroma.

Fenugreek

Fenugreek 4 the soul is an annual plant belonging to the Fabaceae family. It can be used either as herb (from plant leaves) or as spice (from seeds). The small seeds are a yellowish brown color and have a somewhat bitter taste and potent aroma.
Benefits

Why use Fenugreek?​

Since fenugreek is known, it has been used for various purposes amongst cultures. For example: the Ancient Egyptians used it for treating burns and inducing childbirth.

Even today, it is used to control cramps during menstruation. Greeks used it as a soothing herb. The ancient Romans used it to treat fevers and respiratory and intestinal issues.

Recipe

How to use Fenugreek?

Fenugreek is used as a herb (from dried or fresh leaves), spice (from seeds), and vegetable (from fresh leaves, sprouts, and microgreens).

Fenugreek seeds are cuboid-shaped and are in yellow- to-amber colour. These seeds are frequently encountered in the cuisines of the Indian subcontinent. They can be used as both whole and powdered in the preparation of pickles, vegetable dishes, dal, and spice mixes.

Hereby a sample healthy recipe:
  • <1 cup of water
  • Fennel seeds
  • 1 tbs Fenugreek
Put all the ingredients in a pot and boil. Strain the mixture and serve. This drink is used to relieve cramps during menstruation.
Origins

Where does Fenugreek come from?

India is one of the major producers of fenugreek. In India, Rajasthan accounts for over 80% of India’s output.
Harvest

When is Fenugreek grown?

Soil: A rich well drained loamy soil is best suited for fenugreek cultivation.

Climate: Cool and comparatively dry, frost free climate.

Season: June – July and October – November.

Sowing time: Last week of October and first week of November is the best time for sowing.

Irrigation: Three to four irrigations on 30th day, 75th day, 85th and 105th day after sowing.

Harvesting: For vegetable purposes, harvesting of crops can be started from 20-25 days after sowing. Whereas for grain purpose, harvesting is done 90-100 days after sowing.

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